Turnip, Shogoin

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    Print This

Geography/History:
Turnip greens are definitely the leaves of the turnip plant, also known because of its delicious root. Turnip, that clinically referred to as Brassica rapa , is probably the Cruciferae family, a cousin to many other health-protective giants which includes kale, collards, cabbage as well as broccoli. turnip greens are smaller sized and much more soft compared to their cousin, collards. Their somewhat bitter taste is delightful. Turnip greens are an essential veggie in conventional Southern American cooking.

Turnip green is the title provided to the edible regions of the turnip plant. Turnip greens usually are its delicious leaves, however the turnip plant’s roots are delicious too. Turnip is actually a veggie generally seen as a  whitish color of its root. It comes from the family referred to as Brassicaceae. Additionally, it is probably the genus of Brassica. All of the different kinds of plants which come from this family usually are cabbage and mustard plants and in addition they consist of particular other well-known varieties of veggies just like cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, collards, kale and radish. Turnip has been utilized by several cultures for a lot of hundreds of years.

Nutritional Value:
From a nutritional standpoint the leaves are the most important part. They are rich in vitamins A, C, E, B6 and K folate, chlorophyll and some important phytochemicals (including isothiocyanates). They are also an excellent source of the minerals calcium, copper and manganese. In addition, turnip greens are an excellent source of dietary fiber.

The roots contain vitamin C, complex carbohydrates, soluble fiber, lysine and tryptophan.

Sun:                              Full
Spacing:                      4″ – 6″
Height:                        16′′ – 22′′
Optimum Soil pH:    6.5 to 6.8
Days To Maturity:    42
Sowing Method:       Outdoors

Planting/Growing Tips:
Heirloom turnip seeds can be planted in early spring or early fall.   Plant turnip seeds 1” apart and thin weakest seedlings to desired spacing.  Keep soil evenly moist to prevent roots from getting woody.  For longer harvest, stagger turnip plantings every 2-3 weeks.

 

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