Squash, Zucchini – Dark Green

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    Print This

Geography/History:

The zucchini or courgette is a summer squash which can reach nearly a meter in length, but which is usually harvested at half that size or less. Along with certain other squashes and pumpkins, it belongs to the species Cucurbita pepo. Zucchini can be dark or light green. A related hybrid, the golden zucchini, is a deep yellow or orange color.  In a culinary context, the zucchini is treated as a vegetable, which means it is usually cooked and presented as a savory dish or accompaniment. Botanically, however, the zucchini is an immature fruit, being the swollen ovary of the zucchini flower.

Nutritional Value:
The zucchini fruit is low in calories (approximately 15 food calories per 100 g fresh zucchini) and contains useful amounts of folate (24 μg/100 g), potassium (280 mg/100 g) and vitamin A (384 IU[115 μg]/100 g).

Sun:                              Full
Spacing:                      24″ – 36″
Height:                        24″ – 36”
Optimum Soil Ph:    6.0 to 7.5
Days To Maturity:    45 – 65
Sowing Method:       Outdoors

Planting/Growing Tips:

Heirloom summer squash are warm weather crops, as the name implies and the germination temperature verifies.  Only plant once the soil temperature warms to at least 70 degrees.  Mounding up small hills will create the right soil consistency and allow the soil to warm quicker.  Mix in a shovelful of compost with handfulls of bone meal and wood ash to create the perfect soil environment for these heirloom seeds.

Plant 3-6  squash seeds per hill.  Once they have shown true leaves and grown in size, you should thin out to the 3 strongest plants.  Remember, harvest these summer squash continually in order to keep the plant producing.

 

 

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